Neuse Tile Service

Tile installation and service tips from professional installers


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Championship team for locker room tile

It takes a team — to win a national championship, to complete a successful construction project, and to get your tile installed correctly.

We are honored to be featured on the cover of our industry’s unc-pools-compTileLetter publication for our work at the UNC Basketball Locker Room. [TileLetter 2017 at Dean Smith Center.]

It was a great project for the Neuse Tile team, of course, but, as good as they are, it takes more than just our skilled craftsmen to make it happen. Our behind-the-scenes team members monitor every detail of estimating, ordering, warehousing, scheduling, supervising, and accounting. And, with a project like this one that’s happening at a rapid pace, with strict parameters, and involving a variety of types of installation, there are also representatives from mortar manufacturers, tile suppliers, and industry specifiers ready to help. (The accumulation of years of industry experience and lots of shared industry knowledge help, too 🙂

We appreciate the hard work of all members of the tile team, as well as the UNC facility staff, the Architects at Corley Redfoot, and the design professionals in the comp JimSink22 overview with partitionsKansas City office of HOK. And a particular thank you to General Contractor, Vision Contractors Inc. for including us in this truly championship locker room!


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CTEF highlights one of our own

Juan Sauceda, our lead superintendent, is the featured Certified Tile Installer in the current blog by Ceramic Tile Education Foundation! He’s been with our team since 2002, and we love the artistry and craftsmanship he brings to every project. Neuse Tile Service's Juan Sauceda CTI#64, with a poster depicting many projects that he has either overseen or installed.

Take a few minutes to read about Juan and his credentials. He’ll take great care of your next project!  https://www.ceramictilefoundation.org/blog/certification-greater-efficiency-setting-tile


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Slam-dunk tile in UNC locker room

Take a break from Thanksgiving family dynamics and enjoy these photos of our recent tile installations in the UNC men’s basketball locker room at the Dean E. Smith Center in Chapel Hill. Mud bed floors flowing to 12 different drains, large-format glass in an expansive area, polished stone, 2×2 mosaics, large-format porcelain in multiple sizes, and honed decorative stone made this one a technical treat. Thanks to Vision Contractors and the facility managers and coaches for adding us to the team for this special, world-class project!


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Why pay for tile twice?

We often write about coming in behind tile placers who have done residential jobs poorly or left homeowners with failed installations, but this happens on the commercial side as well. One of our local contractors recently called us in to evaluate and tear out SCHMALZ STEPS compressed the tiled steps in a commercial building.

The tile installer they hired initially had little experience installing tile on steps, and their finished work showed it. The  building owner was not satisfied, and the contractor called us to correct the problems. We completely re-worked the steps, and they look great now since we used the proper adhesives, planned the layout before setting any tile, and finished it all with Schluter’s Trep-E stair nosing profiles.

But, why do things have to be done twice?

General contractors feel tremendous pressure to produce the lowest bid when vying for projects, and, to get there, they feel they must take proposals from low-cost providers. The end result is sometimes adequate, and sometimes, as in this case, more expensive. The cost of increased supervision, project delays, multiple change orders, and potentially unsatisfied customers is real. If only we could get those making the ultimate decisions on selecting a contractor to understand that Quality Should Not Be Cheap. The low bid contractor or tile installer should be the first bid thrown out because someone has missed something or cut a corner that will be costly later on.

Knowledge and craftsmanship are costly to obtain, and it’s fair to ask the end user to pay for that high-quality work. Long-lasting, beautiful tile installations with no hassles, no headaches, and no callbacks should be the expectation, and a ‘Schmuck in a Truck’ can’t get there with his low-ball price.

 


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Removing barriers in good design

As part of ongoing community education efforts by the Home Builders Association, our own Nyle Wadford participated in a local radio program on a recent Saturday morning. WPTF 680’s Eye on Health program featured several members of the Raleigh-Wake County HBA’s C.A.R.E. Council explaining how their companies work together to help make homes accessible for everyone.

Nyle talked about the increased requests we’ve had for curbless or stepless showers. NYLE ON RADIO WPTF 2-13-16Innovations in tile technology have made it possible to keep water inside a shower without the traditional ‘curb’ or step at the doorway (if you have a knowledgeable installer). He explained that the traditional curb is also a point of failure for many improperly installed showers. “To avoid future problems, it’s essential to hire professional trade contractors with credentials that demonstrate knowledge and commitment to their industry,” he explained.

Lewis Sadler of Sadler Construction explained that the HBA’s Council for Ageless Residential Environments (C.A.R.E.) Council was started with a desire to educate the construction community and the general public about all the options available in barrier-free living. By designing to reduce entry steps, widen doorways, incorporate technology, open up bathroom spaces, and think about future use, any home can be built to accommodate future mobility challenges. The intuitive design of this type of ageless home or remodel is a beautiful alternative to the institutional look of historically ‘accessible’ homes.

More Americans are living multi-generationally and our population is aging, so the need for more functional spaces is gaining increased attention, said Nancy Caggia, a Berkshire Hathaway Home Services York Simpson Underwood Realtor and Senior Real Estate Specialist.

Sadler detailed the cost savings achieved by building accessible features into a home during initial construction versus the need to retrofit a space if a family member becomes mobility challenged. As he explained, a person coming home from a rehab center must have a way to enter and exit the home safely as well as have access to a bathroom where they can maneuver. The increased grading costs and upgrades that would make a home fully accessible may cost 2-5% more during the original construction of a new home, but there is a huge savings when compared to going back and remodeling after-the-fact.

Other members of the C.A.R.E. Council specialize in the fields of home technology, cabinets, countertops, flooring, elevators, design, real estate, as well as new construction and remodeling. A full list of members can be found at www.HBAcare.com.

Eye on Health airs on 680 WPTF on Saturday’s at 7 am to help listeners navigate the many choices and issues we face as we age or care for an aging loved one.  You can listen to the show at  http://wptfeyeonhealth.blogspot.com/2016/02/eye-on-health-02-13-2016.html


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Terrific tile from 2015

Thanks to some of the country’s best installers, our fantastic customers, and the most knowledgeable tile team anywhere, we’re wrapping up a good year in tile. We’ve been honored to be included in some great projects in 2015, so here’s a sample for your viewing pleasure:

WF Bap entry tile

Large tile is here to stay, & custom patterns add interest.

VAUG- L NEW BATH comp

Intricate cuts and plenty of patience created this fantastic feature bath.

BR curbless fb

Removing barriers – properly installed curbless showers are a new norm.

Subway shower red

Classic subway tile is always a winner.

 

heat mat fb

Practical luxury — heated floors continue to gain popularity.

Stack stone fireplace comp

Stacked stone is a great way to create a fireplace focal point.

mars splash close

Lots of glass on the walls this year. Installed well, it’s a fantastic backsplash.

 

 

 

 

porch floor wa

Upstairs porch tile installations have needed our expertise this year. Done properly, they’re beautiful and functional.

At dedication.jpg

A tiled mosaic in Louisburg features the largest state motto ever. NTS craftsmen & a local artist created public beauty.

VITA VITE MENS BATH

Tile as creative expression takes hold in this new Downtown Raleigh commercial  space.


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Top 10 List for a Quality Tile Installation

The Ceramic Tile Education Foundation has put together a Top 10 List of requirements for a quality tile installation. Make sure your installer considers (and understands) all these factors for your upcoming installation. OR, skip to the bottom of the list and ask Neuse Tile to oversee numbers 10-2 for you ;).

10. Adequate Cure Time: Allow an installation to cure sufficiently before exposing it to moisture, traffic, temperature changes or overlaying products. The amount of time required will vary based on site conditions and the specific materials being used.

9.  Controlled Site Conditions:  Jobsite conditions can have a serious impact on the success or failure of a tile installation. Many products used in tile installations require that the temperature be maintained within a specific range and duration. Be certain to follow the manufacturer’s guidelines to ensure a long-lasting installation.

8.  Crack Isolation Membrane: Cracks in concrete and other areas of movement should be treated with a crack isolation membrane to help eliminate cracked tiles. Check with the membrane manufacturer for specific use and application recommendations.

7.  Premium Materials: The use of premium quality bonding materials is money well spent. Tile Industry experts agree this is one of the easiest insurance policies for preventing installation problems. All types of setting materials are available in various performance grades to meet the requirements of the job. Contact the setting material manufacturer for products with the specific product characteristics and performance levels necessary for success

6.  Flat Surfaces: In order to provide a flat ceramic or stone tile installation, carpenters, masons, concrete installers and other trades must meet the tile industry standards for flatness tolerances. If substandard surfaces are encountered, they must be corrected before the tile installation begins.

5.  Rigid Surface: Ceramic tile installations require a stiff or rigid surface. In some cases, installations, including natural stone, may require additional subflooring, wall studs or bracing. Contractors should follow the applicable recommendations of the TCNA Handbook for Ceramic, Glass and Stone Tile Installation, the ANSI, American National Specifications for the Installation of Ceramic Tile as well as the recommendations of the manufacturer whose products are being used in the project.

4.  Correct Methods and Materials: Not all installation methods and/or materials are suitable for all applications. Be certain that your contractor will use the TCNA Handbook method rated for the intended application or a method that is recommended, fully specified, and warranted by the product manufacturer. Research manufacturers’ websites to determine suitability, application recommendations and product warranty information. Review the manufacturer’s product data sheets and recommendations for the tile, backer board, bonding materials, membranes and grout which will be used on the job. Just because a product is available doesn’t mean that it is appropriate for a given installation.

3.  Mortar Coverage: Tile industry standards require minimum mortar coverage of 80% in dry areas and 95% in wet (showers) or exterior areas. This refers to the contact area of the bonding material (thin-bed mortars, large and heavy tile mortars or epoxy adhesives) with both the back of the tile and the surface being tiled.

2.  Movement Accommodation Joints: All tile installations, both residential and commercial, will move with temperature and humidity variations. To accommodate this expansion and contraction activity, the use of expansion joints per the TCNA Handbook for Ceramic, Glass and Stone Tile Installation method EJ171 must be incorporated into the tile work. Be certain that all parties involved in the project including the architect, the specifier, the designer, the salesperson and the tile installer know and understand the critical use and placement of expansion joints.

1.  Skilled Installers: Only well-trained and experienced tile installers can produce installations of the highest quality which provide long lasting beauty and functionality. In order to differentiate this quality oriented tile installer from others in the field, consider hiring a CTEF Certified Tile Installer (CTI). CTIs have proven that they have the knowledge and skills which meet industry standards and best practices. Click here to go to the CTI overview page.